Monday, May 11, 2020

Quarantine Qontent

An anonymous art installation in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn, April 23, 2020.

Here's a continually updated list of art material to enjoy while galleries are closed. Most of the items resulted from the lockdown; a few other items join them.

COOKBOOKS
  • Artists and Recipes: Artist Abby Lloyd has tapped dozens of artists—Joshua AbelowTisch Abelow, Gina Beavers, and Robin Winters among them—to contribute recipes for a cookbook. Super fun design.
  • Perilla: Edited by curator Jamie Sterns, who runs the enterprising Interstate Projects in Brooklyn, this is a cookbook in the most wonderfully loose sense of the word, with toothsome recipes sharing space with poems, collages, and short essays, by some 30 artists and writers, including Rose Salane, Priscilla Jeong, Bryce Gates, and more. (I contributed an essay on the Stettheimers' dinner parties.)
  • Chicken Soup: Chef Mina Stone, who helms MoMA PS1's delicious cafe, is sharing recipes from artists, including Dara Friedman's “Perfectly Whatever” chicken soup and Anicka Yi's potent, enlivening lemon pasta.
WRITING
  • Open Air: Paris's excellent Air de Paris gallery, which shows Trisha Donnelly, Lily van der Stokker, and Adriana Lara, has been blogging up a storm, posting videos, poems, drawings, and other material, much of it sent in by its artists. One highlight: Dorothy Iannone's recipe for Zuppa Inglese.
  • "Always on My Mind": Alex Israel files an essay about the first decade of his art, a piece finished while in quarantine lockdown.
  • An Empty Met: As New York's cultural institutions go dark, Jason Farago pays a visit to the museum to see Anthony van Dyck's Saint Rosalie Interceding for the Plague-stricken of Palermo (1624).
  • Helter Shelter: The painter Whitney Claflin speaks with Domenick Ammirati about surviving in New York. "For the past few years, I’ve been living illegally in the leaky garage of a former funeral parlor . . ."
  • Maintenance Art: I wrote about the incredible Mierle Laderman Ukeles and what art can do in a pandemic.
  • Evolution: The dealer Mitchell Algus asks if a more egalitarian art world can emerge from the market's move online.
  • Mortality and the Old Masters: Peter Schjeldahl visits Las Meninas. Heaven.
  • We/Us/Our: Kara Walker on a post-lockdown world.
AUDIO AND VIDEO
  • Snoopy: The official Snoopy YouTube channel reveals how to draw the beloved character.
  • Augment the Virtual: The sculptor Ajay Kurian hosts video chats with artists whose shows have been shuttered by the pandemic, like Uri Aran, Brandon Ndife, and Farah Al Qasimi.
  • The Artist's Edit: Gavin Brown's Enterprise has been asking its artists to compile YouTube playlists, which have been very strong. Start with LaToya Ruby Frazier's expansive ode to labor.
  • Whitney Screens: The New York institution is streaming a different video work every Friday at 7 p.m. EDT. Alex Da Corte's majestic Rubber Pencil Devil (2018) kicked off the series.
  • Gerhard Richter Painting: The Metropolitan Museum of Art has this hypnotic documentary free to all.
  • Show & Tell: Public Art Fund curator Daniel S. Palmer has been doing charming video sessions with artists such as Emily Mae Smith and Paa Joe.
  • Film Fridays: Martos Galley is hosting a new video work on its website each Friday, through the weekend. Entries so far have come from Michel Auder and Devin Troy Strother, Mandy Harris Williams, and Alima Lee.
COLORING PAGES
  • The Fine Art Quarantine Coloring Book: organized by curator Brooke Wise, with contributions from Brian Calvin, Hayden Dunham, Hein Koh, Jamian Juliano-Villani, Raymond Pettibon, Robert Nava, Sayre Gomez, and almost 20 more.
  • The Getty Coloring Book: The august L.A. institution is offering a chance to color everything from an ancient Roman mosaic to Vincent van Gogh's Irises (1889).
  • Louise Lawler’s Tracings: the Museum of Modern Art in New York, which hosted a superb survey of the gimlet-eyed photographer's work in 2017, has a dozen tracings of her works that she made in collaboration with Jon Buller. Heavenly.
  • The Studio Museum: The Harlem stalwart has pages, ready to be bedecked with color, from artists like E.B. Lewis and Paul Rogers.
EXHIBITIONS
  • High as Fuck: Most online art exhibitions are bland, banal affairs—JPEGs floating in space. Whatever you think of Josh Smith's entry into the field, it is certainly not boring. He's installed his latest paintings and some older ceramics on the roof of his Brooklyn home. In accompanying videos, he is on hand as deadpan narrator and gracious host. A little unhinged, and very wonderful, I say. (Some disagree.) A special bonus: sign the guestbook (in a manner of speaking) and you are sent a printable PDF of the show's pamphlet.
  • Bodybuilding: On its website, Performa is presenting this video-rich exhibition that examines how architects and designers have used performance. The stacked roster has been assembled by Charles Aubin, of Performa, and Carlos Mínguez Carrasco, of ArkDes in Stockholm, as an extension of the eponymous book they edited with RoseLee Goldberg.
NEWSLETTERS
  • Something I Saw: Every day, writer and curator Kimberly Drew is mailing an artwork—typically a piquant, poignant one—to your inbox, "until we're done."
FINANCIAL RESOURCES
  • Creative Capital: The nonprofit has compiled a lengthy, essential list of grants and funding available for people and organizations in the arts and is updating it as new initiatives are announced.

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